Patricia Carol Schneller obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Patricia Carol Schneller

August 23, 1934 - January 6, 2018

Obituary


Patricia Carol (Pat) was born on August 23, 1934 to James and Arla Potter of Portland, Oregon. She was blessed with an inquisitive and creative nature that would lead her in life. Warm, giving, honest, devoted, smart, strong, determined and funny, she was a role model extraordinaire and beloved by her family and friends.
Growing up during depressed times, Pat came to understand the value of self-sufficiency and financial responsibility. Her indulgence was in her reading and she had a voracious appetite for books. History and science were prominent among topics.
Graduating from Jefferson High...

Patricia Carol (Pat) was born on August 23, 1934 to James and Arla Potter of Portland, Oregon. She was blessed with an inquisitive and creative nature that would lead her in life. Warm, giving, honest, devoted, smart, strong, determined and funny, she was a role model extraordinaire and beloved by her family and friends.
Growing up during depressed times, Pat came to understand the value of self-sufficiency and financial responsibility. Her indulgence was in her reading and she had a voracious appetite for books. History and science were prominent among topics.
Graduating from Jefferson High School at the early age of 16, she soon met her love and partner, Robert (Bob) Schneller. The two married in 1952, and settled down to raise a family. Her children Phillip, Charity (Marilynn) and Elizabeth were her pride and joy. She joined PTA, attended school functions, supported Blue Birds and encouraged her children in music, sports and arts to further their development and opportunities for success in life.
Pets were an important part of the family household. Over the years, she tolerated a menagerie of fish, turtles, lizards, rats, birds, cats and dogs. Many an unhappy funeral were officiated by her in the back yard. But dogs were closest to her heart, and 'Muffy', 'Lumpy' and 'Woofie' held a permanent place there.
As her youngest child approached adulthood and parental responsibilities diminished, Pat embraced the opportunity to seek new challenges for herself. She enrolled in and graduated from Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham, Oregon, successfully completing all requirements for certification as a Medical Assistant. She thoroughly loved her back-office work and the patients she came into contact with. She worked for gastroenterologists and internal physicians, and was employed early in the burgeoning medical landscape of urgent care clinics.
Following his retirement, her husband's health declined and Pat retired early to spend time with Bob. She faithfully devoted many of her later years to his care. Yet true to her determined and self-sufficient ways, she still painted the entire exterior of her home, designed and installed landscaping, and maintained the yard. All and more while tending to domestic chores and Bob's health needs.
Despite assuming such responsibilities, Pat was actively engaged in her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren's lives. She loved each of them deeply and there was no occasion left unrecognized by a gift or card. Family always brought a smile to her face and she was ready to talk whether you were two or ninety-two. She would engage with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren as if they were the most important people in the world. And they were. Times spent with them were fondly remembered and shared.
Somehow, she found time and energy to crochet, knit and needlepoint. Soft blankets, sweaters and hats, and beautiful pillows and wall hangings are treasured now more than ever by family recipients.
During her 'down time' she participated in several run/walk benefits, loved browsing art fairs, bowled in evening couples' leagues, enjoyed many, many seasons of the Oregon Symphony with her life-long friend, and looked forward to the Scottish Highland Games each year. She enjoyed playing games and watching movies with her family. She was "all in" on picnics, hikes and trips to the beach. She would not turn down a good glass of beer as new brew pubs sprouted around town, and couldn't wait to try new restaurants. She was ready to laugh at herself, and enjoyed sharing that laughter with her children, with whom she remained close.
Although she had hoped to travel abroad - especially to Scotland - circumstances prevented this. She did, however, travel the states and especially loved Hawaii. She was eager to visit new places and explore - whether new horizons on land or in print.
In print, she would delve into topics as diverse as history of the Scots and celestial mechanics. What she didn't understand, she studied on her own, and brought home volumes from the library to help inform her. Her family history was important to her, especially her Scottish heritage on her father's side. Her research was limited only by the lack of access to ready information now offered by the internet. Her children and grandchildren look forward to continuing in her interest.
Her body tired easily in later years, but her enthusiasm for life did not. Recently, she had reconnected with high school classmates and looked forward to regular breakfasts out, and occasional happy hours as time and energy allowed. These renewed connections added richly to her life.
Until her passing, Pat showed strength of character and determination to live her life to its fullest and to live it on her own terms. She wanted to remain independent, and she did. She wanted to remain in her home, and she did. She managed all of the affairs of her life to fine detail, and strove to organize them well on her family's behalf.
Hers was a rich life. And in her life's chapters, she has written the consummate 'how-to' book for her family: How to visualize large and long term; how to set aside the small and inconsequential; how to make do and overcome obstacles; how to reach for and achieve success; how to maintain one's sense of self; and, most importantly, how to give and to love.
She will be missed.